The Design of the Museum

The Design of the Museum is shaped as a Horn. The Horn is synonymous with a trumpet which is a musical instrument often used in religious ceremonies. However, in Africa, the Horn means much more to our ancient traditions and culture. In Africa, the Horn has historically been associated with the Cows horn, the Rams horn, and the Elephant tusk, all representing great strength, yet great humility. The African Horn is usually blown during special ceremonies signifying a message that something or someone great is coming. The horn serves as a voice imitation of profound messages that cannot be spoken out loud. It can be blown to appease the ancestors and the land, go to war, welcome Royalties and Dignitaries, to recount history and pass on information or be a rallying call for a select group of people to come together.This is why we chose the Horn as the shape of the Museum. This Horn will be a beacon to the Pan African Family world-wide, representing the proverbial urgent call to gather ourselves in unity for true reconciliation and liberation.

Designer of Museum – George Wireko-Brobby

Be a Part of History,

The Museum

Our Mission

The mission of the organization is to create an environment for people of African descent and all others to discover and experience the true history of the Origins of Humanity, the Development of Cultures and the Great Civilizations of the Nile Valley that influenced the past, informs the present and will shape the future, serving as an inspiration for generations to come.

Architecture

Exterior Exhibits Overview

Garden of Sculptures

  • Pan African political leaders
  • Pan African Heroes/Heroines
  • Pan African Leaders in Science & Tech
  • Pan African Inventors/Innovators
  • Pan African Youth Leaders
  • Pan African scholars & writers

Herbal/Plant Farm (with Chalets)

  • African Herbal Medicinal plants
  • Accommodation for living
  • Space for Spiritual Revival
  • Orchard
  • Whole Foods Shop/Restaurant

Palace of African Kingdoms

  • Replica of African Kingdoms (Ancient & Modern) with Curators to guide visitors
  • Each kingdom will display its arts & culture, and provide space to shop souvenirs and dine

LATEST NEWS & UPDATES

Toyin Falola interview with The Honorable Kojo Yankah

Dr. Toyin Falola recently interviewed PAHW's founder The Honorable Kojo Yankah to discuss Pan-Africanism, university education, and development. You can watch part one bellow, and then checkout part two on Dr. Toyin Falola's Youtube channel here, or through his...

Honoring Dr Iva Carruthers

Honoring Dr Iva Carruthers

This week, we're also celebrating one of the greatest educators, social advocates and ministerial leaders of our time, our proud Academic Council member of the Pan African Heritage World (PAHW), the iconic Dr. Iva Carruthers, also revered as Mama Iva. As a Founder and...

Honoring The Honorable Kojo Yankah

Honoring The Honorable Kojo Yankah

This week we are celebrating one of Africa’s greatest visionaries and the Founder of the Pan African Heritage World Museum—the Honorable Kojo Yankah. Besides being one of Africa’s most celebrated journalists with numerous published books —his most recent being the...

An Online Digital Museum

Use AR to experience African history

AR Exerience only available
while using the Safari browser
on an iPhone or iPad.

three.js

Experience History in Immersive 3D

M’Bigou Stone Sculpture from Gabon

Pan African Heritage World’s Online Digital Museum will feature 10 immersive cultural exhibits with dozens of 3D models, videos, music, and narration.

Each exhibit will showcase the diverse nature of the African story as it extends outside of Africa and throughout the world.

 

Knowledge

He who does not know, can know from Learning

Adinkra symbols were originally created by the Gyaman, an Akan people of Ghana and the Ivory coast. Nana Kwadwo Agyemang Adinkra is credited with their creation, and named them after himself. Our symbol was created by Dr G. Kojo Arthur.

The Dream

I welcome you to join this mission.

I have been inspired over the years by the wisdom of our ancestors that we Africans and people of African descent will restore and regain our dignity and pride if we learn our history told by our own people and work together to unite our African family.

Having grown up in Ghana during the Kwame Nkrumah era, and having been involved in Pan Africanist activities including chairing the PANAFEST in Ghana for 10 years, and having had the privilege of being Board Chairman of the Ghana Heritage Conservation Trust for another 10 years, I consider it a sacred obligation at this time in world history to create and lead a team to spearhead the establishment of a Pan African Heritage World. This Heritage World will include a Museum, a Herbal Plant Farm, an African Cultural Village depicting all great African Kingdoms, a Conference Center, and Grounds for African Festivals – indeed a rare space for historical enlightenment, a spiritual upliftment, and irrepressible inspiration, located appropriately in Ghana, the beacon of African liberation.

In establishing the African University College of Communications in Ghana in 2002, I was reminded by some of the nuggets in our ancestral wisdom: ‘A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture are like a tree without roots’, and more pointedly ‘Until the lions have their historians, tales of hunting will always glorify the hunter’.

It needs no further analysis and teaching what our ancestors predicted: “No matter how long the night, there will be dawn”.

There could not have been a better time in world history for this project, and I personally invite you to join us on this journey.

Thank you for your support to help bring this vision into reality.

In Unity,

Kojo Yankah
Founder/Creator
kojoyankah.net

Donate

Pan African Heritage World needs your support. Our tireless volunteers, partners, and sponsors have labored to make it to this stage, but our work has only just begun.

Consider partnering with us to make this dream a reality!

What does Pan African Heritage mean to you?

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“We must sacrifice all that we have in order to teach and educate our children, for the future is in their hands.”

 

– Patrice Lumumba

“While the rest of the world is improving technology, Ghana has been improving the quality of man’s humanity to man.”

 

– Maya Angelou

“The forces that unite us are intrisic and greater than the superimposed influences that keep us apart.”

 

– Kwame Nkrumah

“Once you know who you are, you don’t have to worry anymore.”

– Nikki Giovanni

“It’s time for Black People to stop playing the separating game of geography, or where the slave ship put us down. We must concentrate on where the slave ship picked us up.”

 

– John Henrik Clarke

“The doll-baby type of woman is a thing of the past, and the wide-awake woman is forging ahead prepared for all emergencies, and ready to answer any call, even if it be to face cannons on the battlefield.”

 

– Amy Jacques Garvey

“If you have no confidence in self, you are twice defeated in the race of life.”

– Marcus Garvey

“This is precisely the time when artists go to work. There is no time for despair, no place for self-pity, no need for silence, no room for fear. We speak, we write, we do language. That is how civilizations heal.”

– Toni Morrison

“I lifted mine eyes to Ghana and swept the hills with high hosannna.”

– W.E.B Dubois

“We all have a certain measure of responsibility to those who have made it possible for us to take advantage of today’s responsibilities.”

– Angela Davis

“Ghana has something to say to us.”

 

– Martin Luther King

“Emancipate yourselves from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds.”

 

– Bob Marley

“And I came to discover what it means to stand on your feet without looking for someone to blame, suffering but discovering things, I began to discover life.”

 

– Victoria Santa Cruz

“I don’t feel like I am a visitor in Ghana, I feel that I am home.”

 

– Malcolm X

“Part of being a revolutionary is creating a vision that is more humane. That is more fun, too. That is more loving. It’s really working to create something beautiful.”

– Assata Shakur

“We have finished the job, what shall we now do with the tools?”

 

– Haille Selassie